Cheating……Why do Students Cheat?

I’ve been thinking about this lately.  Cheating has been in the news.  Recently the most famous cheat of all was finally exposed and admitted his cheating.  Lance Armstrong – 7 time winner of the most prestigious bike race in the world , Le Tour de France – admitted cheating every year.  He did illegal things to gain an advantage and broke the rules.  His career is a disaster.  He was motivated by his need to win at all costs and while knowing he could cheat and still win. But he is exposed and his career is a disaster.

Why do people cheat when they know it is wrong?  This is a really difficult question to answer.  There are no easy answers.  People make choices and find ways to justify their actions even when they know they are doing things that are wrong.

Cheating in schools is a significant problem.  Why do students cheat in school?  It could be that:

  • They just don’t know the work/material and copying or plagiarizing is the easiest way out
  • They haven’t spent time on the work and are unprepared
  • They give their work to someone else to be a good friend
  • They want to gain an advantage over others
  • They don’t think their behavior is a big deal and feel it is okay to cheat, after all there are many examples of successful cheaters in the world. Continue reading

To Uniform or Not To Uniform…..

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED in JANUARY 2013, 2 years ago…….

The LCS community is in the midst of a discussion about school uniforms.  Parents, Teachers, and Students are engaging with the debate as to whether we should adopt a uniform for our students.  It is a debate with some passionate representation for both sides of the discussion.

What are the pros and cons?  What do you really think?

Here’s my take on the possible pros and cons.

Pros.  A school uniform could:

  • Support a more focused academic environment
  • Provide an environment that “fits in” to a greater degree with the local Ghanaian context because wearing a uniform to school is normal in Ghana.
  • Eliminate some dress code violation decisions.
  • Limit the issues that students have in choosing and buying a range of clothing choices.  This could eliminate some possible social issues around choice of dress.
  • Support the building of a school identity, associated with a new logo and a new uniform
  • Support parents in their discussions about the choice of clothing

Cons.  A school uniform could:

  • Conflict with the IB philosophy of developing independent, critical, and responsible thinkers who make appropriate decisions.
  • Limit individuality and the opportunity to be an individual based upon your clothes.
  • Result in an atmosphere that is too “uniform”.
  • Eliminate an attractive element of LCS (in the eyes of some, not having a uniform is an attractive aspect of LCS).

There are no guarantees that these pro or con arguments would be completely true.   The only guarantee is that in a large community, diverse opinions exist.  Therefore, the range of arguments will be true for some people.

Here are a few images of potential uniforms from other international schools.  This gives you some idea of the suggestions that have been made.

     

 

(Reminder – this was posted in January, 2013) Thus far only Grade 11 and 10 students have had the chance to submit a vote on the topic of uniforms.  In the coming weeks, other grade levels in the secondary school will have a chance to express their opinion.  While in both grade levels a majority of students are not interested in a uniform, it is important to note that there are many students who do support a uniform. It’s essential to acknowledge and respect the views of both sides with this discussion.

I invite you to leave a comment on this blog with respect to the uniform discussion.

 

Connectivity, Inquiry, and Learning

Ever since the 1990’s when “google it” became a standard expression, a verb,  and a universally understood action, I’ve wondered how lives would change as “google it” would be a reality anytime and anywhere.  For a moment, consider how much more information is being exchanged in your lives with our ever expanding connectivity?

As 2012 closed down a few weeks ago, I found myself thinking about this even more.  Over the holiday, while spending time with my wife and two sons (both in their 20’s) we were regularly engaged in discussions that often led to a need for additional information.  One of us would inevitably “google it” to complete the discussion, or more often win the debate! This was true in our house, in our car, on the beach, or on a hike.  Growing coverage and access in Ghana is impressive!  Besides seeking debate-winning nuggets of information, we regularly gathered movie reviews, weather reports, and news headlines.    We listened to news podcasts, watched video clips on Youtube, skyped with family members on other continents, fact checked through Wikipedia, and checked on work responsibilities. We looked for directions using Google maps, tracked international flights, ensured we understood the rules to card games, and downloaded reading materials and ebooks.  We had a very personal and intimate experience as a family but, make no mistake, we were plugged in, (when we weren’t napping with our books on the beach) and we were online using our connectivity.   I do like my iphone and ipad!

Beyond a minimal nugget of information to sway an argument, I found myself thinking more and more about how this extensive connectivity provided opportunities for my individualized learning.  While traveling down the coast, we were picking and choosing the topics and the timing for extending our learning.  We were glad to have solid 3G access as we searched and shared historical info Continue reading

Parenting Our Digital Natives…Resources for Parents

Our kids are digital natives.  We know that.   We have to make adjustments as parents and educators. What are the opportunities?  What are the challenges?  If we don’t embrace, learn, lead, teach, manage, and understand then we are in danger of committing malpractice as parents and educators.

Fundamentally, though, it’s not parenting styles or intuition that is changing.  It is the playing field. The playing field is a globally connected, anytime/anywhere accessible world, immersed in digital devices that overload us with information, interactions, decisions, and an ever expanding horizon.  Ethical, responsible, and thoughtful decision making and inquiry are needed for people to navigate and harness their connectivity. But ethical, responsible, and thoughtful decision making has always been the goal!  Helping kids make good decisions and mentoring kids towards becoming responsible beings is what parenting is all about.  The landscape in the 21st century has changed!

There are many resources for parents.  A quick search of resources in google and youtube for parent resources leads you to many links.  There is good information available to help guide parent decision making and parent/child discussions about online ethics. Parents must stay informed, accept the realities of our digital world, and reflect upon the impact it has on our parenting decisions.  Conversations, structures, and rules for our kids all need to be considered.  Our actions as adults matter as we help shape and guide our kids forward.

Below are some links for parents that can produce some interesting dialogue. The youtube videos are relatively short but provide some fundamental thinking and ideas.

 Digital Generation Parents Share Their Wisdom

Cyberbullying Solutions for Parents

FB, YouTube, Texting – Rules of the Road for Kids

Tips for Digital Generation Parenting

Sexting and kids – what parents need to know

Slideshare for parents – a resource from David Truss

Disconnect to Connect

Raising Digital Kids, Engaging Your Kids – a resource from David Truss.  This is a nice summary of some things to think about as you are discussing limits and engaging in dialogue with your son/daughter.

Here is an interesting article from the Washington.   For parents who are thinking hard and long about steps to take with their kids, this is a good article to provide some support.  Mom’s Code of Conduct for her son

 

 

 

A Fresh Start – January 2013 – Any New Years Resolutions?

Any New Years resolutions out there?

One of the best parts of working in (or attending a) school is the opportunity for renewal.  New school years, new calendar years (2013), new reporting quarters, new units of study, new events and new opportunities.

As a student you can explore and re-invent yourself at different times.  That is part of being a teenager.  As an adult, you can constantly renew your professional learning, make resolutions to be fitter, resolve to read more books and take time for yourself or your family, be more organized, and so on.

New Years resolutions are just one opportunity to consider goals and plans for the coming months.

Here’s an excellent collection of TED Talks from the site 12 TED Talks that will inspire New Years Resolutions

Bookmark this TED Talk site.  There are 12 really excellent talks to listen to.  I have managed a couple of them today.  Carve out a few minutes and listen to one.

Feel free to leave a comment on this post and share a new years resolution!

Digital Images and Cyberbullying – What to do?

This post is dedicated to students who have been cyber bullied.  My goal is to offer some support, resources, and learning for students.   I have embedded several videos and a web site links for students to view.  My goal is to support the building of community where every individual feels safe and valued.

With respect to cyber bullying……….

About one-third of online teens (ages 12-17) have been cyberbullied. Girls are more likely to be targeted.

(Lenhart A. Cyberbullying and Online Teens. Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2007.)

These numbers are staggering.  Online bullying is far too common place.  Inappropriate decision making (or a lack of decision making) is far too common.

Here is a profound video…have a look. It’s called You Can’t Take it Back. It’s from the web site www.netsmartz.org/RealLifeStories.   If the video doesn’t open from the blog, use the link right here:

You Can’t Take It Back


 

Here is another short video along the same lines.  It’s called “Your Photo Fate”.  Again, make good decisions!  It’s from the web site www.netsmartz.org/RealLifeStories

Again, if it doesn’t open below from the blog, use this link: Your Photo Fate

 

This 16 year old radio news reporter broadcast this story on the radio on January 7, 2013.  She lives in New York City.   The title is:  Online Shaming A New Level of Cyberbullying for Girls  Listen to this story about teenagers, from teenagers

So what can you do about it? Here is a great site for students who have been cyber bullied, check this out:

A Thin Line

The site is sponsored by MTV.  The point of the site is clear, if you are a victim of cyber bullying, there are steps you can take to fight back and take control. Don’t let bullies win!

Here’s a link to a set of Frequently Asked Questions around Cyberbullying addressed to teenagers.  If you wish to see it, click here.

The Media and Teenage Girls

This post is focused upon the portrayal of female teenagers in the media.  There are two resources on this site.  Being aware of the impact of the media and effects the media has on how girls self-perceptions is really important.

In browsing sites the other day my wife found this video and shared it with me, so I would share this with secondary school students.  Have a look at the documents and videos on this post and consider the important messages they hold.  How does the media impact young women?

A Girl’s Guide To Battling The Harmful Effects Of Mass Media from MoveOn.org

 

In addition, take a look at this site.  It is called Day of the Girl.

It is a site with excellent resources for teenage girls around the topic of the media.  It is worth taking a look at and browsing as deeply as you wish to.  There are many voices of teenage girls on the site.

 

In addition, there is a site dedicated to the film Miss Representation.  We will be showing this movie at LCS in the future.  It is a powerful movie.  If you wish to know more about this film and explore the topic, google Miss Representation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phones – Learning Tools or Short Cut Tools?

This was the image of a teacher’s desk during a recent mid-semester exam.  Our students were not able to hold onto the phones because some students will use them to gain an advantage over other students.  In a straightforward semester exam, phones offer multiple methods for cheating (creative short cuts!!)

 

When will these phones be used as learning tools, not as “cheating” devices during exams for students?  When will they be  learning tools on a regular basis in the classroom?  How are we going to deal with the ubiquitous nature of technology in schools?  The proliferation of smart phones, tablets, ipads and other wireless devices in schools coupled with growing bandwidth and wireless access, presents unknown potential for teaching and learning.

How will these tools support the end goals of a K-12 education?  How will these tools support the development of the skills needed for being a self-regulated learner, a self-reliant learner, and a lifelong learner?

Perhaps they impact learning more than we consider at present.  Consider the amount of communication the tools already support amongst students.  Perhaps, in all that texting and image/document sharing that is taking place all the time – literally 24/7 (with a few hours in the middle of the  night to catch some sleep) there are some educational and/or school related exchanges of Continue reading

What are grades for? Why do we grade students?

Report Card time!

In U.S. schools, grades became part of the fabric of education in the late 1800’s. A need existed to separate students according to how well they were learning the content of the curriculum.  Was the reason for grading to attempt to motivate students?  Perhaps it was.

We aim to communicate achievement and learning with our grades.  We aim to provide feedback to students and parents about how well students are progressing.  We are not interested in ranking students nor do we ever group students around their grades.  We do, however, want to make sure that the feedback students and parents receive from grades is a true and honest indicator of learning.

In addition, narrative written comments from teachers provide additional feedback and information which should be used to effect learning, work habits, and spurn reflective conversations with parents and children.  It is clear that narrative comments are essential to rounding out the communication on a report card. They offer a personal message from teacher to student.

Feedback to students is critical to learning.  Research shows that the single most important tool in a teacher’s toolbox for learning is their ability to provide timely and high quality feedback.  Report cards should be seen in this light.  It is feedback and it is time to reflect upon that feedback.

However, grading and reporting are NOT essential to the learning process. Timely and constructive feedback is important for learning but not grades.  So what are grades for and why do we grade students?  The grades must be seen as a way to provide feedback about progress towards specific criteria.

Most students want to achieve high grades.  For students who wish to receive higher grades, what do they need to do in order to earn those grades?  In Continue reading

A giant exhale……profound sadness…..and inspirational commitment

The last day of school (Friday, December 14 – 12/14/12) prior to vacation is always a welcome day!  This past week our last day also brought the excitement of a Grade 12 student who received his early acceptance to Cornell University, the college of his choice.  His acceptance added a great buzz to the last day for our Grade 12 students and for our teachers.  One teacher commented on the great satisfaction that teachers of Seniors take as college admissions roll in over the course of the second semester.  The hard work of preparing students for IB exams and supporting them as they navigate the obstacles of Grade 12 including the college admissions process offers positive rewards to teachers in the form of a successful college application.  We do this work because we have a passion for teaching, building relationships with students, supporting them as they uncover Continue reading